Ricko Dogsitter – A Humane Way to Stop Dog Barking When You Aren’t At Home.

Ricko Dogsitter – A Humane Way to Stop Dog Barking When You Aren’t At Home.

  • No Shocks, Sprays or Sub-Sonic Sounds to Scare or Hurt Your Pet.
  • Delivers YOUR COMMAND in YOUR VOICE and each time your dog barks when you’re not around.
  • Battery powered, cordless unit allows you to place this anywhere in your house or apartment. Doesn’t hang on dog or collar like other devices.
  • Adjustable: Both command release volume and ‘bark detection’ levels can be adjusted
  • Gives you data: Ricko tracks # of times it was activated so you can track progress.

The Ricko Dogsitter is the first of its kind – a humane way to curb your dog’s barking when you’re not around. Ricko was designed by ‘dog-loving’ german engineers who had dog barking problems of their own. It’s easy to set up and get started. There are adjustor knobs on the front of the unit so you can set both playback volume and bark detection levels. The unit keeps track of the number of times it was activated while you were away so you know how much barking is going on and can track the p

Price: $ 99.95

How do you clicker train your dog if you aren’t allowed to correct behaviours?

Question by Hayley ಠ⌣ಠ: How do you clicker train your dog if you aren’t allowed to correct behaviours?
Okay, so I am fairly new to clicker training but am hoping that someone can help me out.

It is said that with clicker training that you do not correct unwanted behaviours and instead, reward the good behaviours.

That means never telling your dog “Uh UH!” or “No!” if they do something undesirable.

Does this mean that you cannot correct unwanted behaviours when you AREN’T training?

For example when your dog jumps up constantly even while you are ignoring it? (just an example..) Or if you are going out for a walk with your dog and they bark if they see another dog? Are you not meant to correct it?

I think I might be getting the wrong idea about clicker training.. I still have a lot to learn.

Any info about this would be helpful.

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And also.. a bonus question: I’ve heard about how some clicker trainers encorperate verbal reinforcers into their training. Such as saying “Yes!” after they click. Is this wrong? How do you go about using verbal reinforcers during clicker training?
Thank you for the your answers everyone. 🙂

Best answer:

Answer by Texas Rottie
For example when your dog jumps up constantly even while you are ignoring it? You turn your back and walk away, maybe have to keep turning away from the dog. Fold your arms in front of you. The dog will get the hint.

Or if you are going out for a walk with your dog and they bark if they see another dog? You cannot teach a dog anything when they are barking, you can only interrupt the behavior and go another direction. Work at being around other dogs at a distance that your dog is not reacting and use rewards for calmness. Then slowly get closer to the other dogs using rewards for calmness. When the dog begins to react you have gotten too close too quick.

Clicker training is great!

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While watching NASCAR races, aren’t you tired of hearing the very stupid term “LUCKY DOG”?

Question by Alfred Pennyworth: While watching NASCAR races, aren’t you tired of hearing the very stupid term “LUCKY DOG”?
Nascar & Nascar fans already take a lot of heat for it being a “redneck” sport. Why do they have to add to this by making it sound so stupid by using “lucky dog”? Why not just say “free pass” or something more descriptive? It’s almost pain in my ears when they say it. I rarely watch races anymore because of stupid terms like this.

The “Lucky dog” rule known as the Free Pass or officially the Beneficiary Rule is a NASCAR rule. The rule allows the driver of the next lapped car or truck behind the leader to gain back a lap during a caution. The driver is called to move to the end of the longest line of the cars at the end of that caution period. This rule was instituted to prevent drivers from racing back to the start/finish line when a caution was called.

Best answer:

Answer by Jeffy.
No.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Why are some shelters “no kill” shelters, but most arent’? Are the no-kill ones privately funded and

Question by Sportsguy_1973: Why are some shelters “no kill” shelters, but most arent’? Are the no-kill ones privately funded and
the regular humane society ones funded just through donations? On average, how long do dogs/cats get to be in a shelter before they are killed? 1 month?

Best answer:

Answer by fluffy_aliens
Some shelters give animals as little as 3 days but most try to keep them as long as possible. I know of at least one shelter that puts to sleep every single animal in its facility on Friday afternoon. It doesn’t matter if they came in last Saturday or if they came in Friday morning.

Until people quit breeding irresponsibly there is no way that all shelters can be no kill. There is just too much overpopulation and too few people who want ‘problem’ dogs from shelters.

Add your own answer in the comments!